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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [principle]

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principle

PRIN'CIPLE, n. [L. principium, beginning.]

1. In a general sense, the cause, source or origin of any thing; that from which a thing proceeds; as the principle of motion; the principles of action.

2. Element; constituent part; primordial substance.

Modern philosophers suppose matter to be one simple principle, or solid extension diversified by its various shapes.

3. Being that produces any thing; operative cause.

The soul of man is an active principle.

4. In science, a truth admitted either without proof, or considered as having been before proved. In the former sense, it is synonymous with axiom; in the latter, with the phrase, established principle.

5. Ground; foundation; that which supports an assertion, an action, or a series of actions or of reasoning. On what principle can this be affirmed or denied? He justifies his proceedings on the principle of expedience or necessity. He reasons on sound principles.

6. A general truth; a law comprehending many subordinate truths; as the principles of morality, of law, of government, &c.

7. Tenet; that which is believed, whether truth or not, but which serves as a rule of action or the basis of a system; as the principles of the Stoics, or of the Epicureans.

8. A principle of human nature, is a law of action in human beings; a constitutional propensity common to the human species. Thus it is a principle of human nature to resent injuries and repel insults.

PRIN'CIPLE, v.t. To establish or fix in tenets; to impress with any tenet, good or ill; chiefly used in the participle.

Men have been principled with an opinion, that they must not consult reason in things of religion.

1. To establish firmly in the mind.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [principle]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

PRIN'CIPLE, n. [L. principium, beginning.]

1. In a general sense, the cause, source or origin of any thing; that from which a thing proceeds; as the principle of motion; the principles of action.

2. Element; constituent part; primordial substance.

Modern philosophers suppose matter to be one simple principle, or solid extension diversified by its various shapes.

3. Being that produces any thing; operative cause.

The soul of man is an active principle.

4. In science, a truth admitted either without proof, or considered as having been before proved. In the former sense, it is synonymous with axiom; in the latter, with the phrase, established principle.

5. Ground; foundation; that which supports an assertion, an action, or a series of actions or of reasoning. On what principle can this be affirmed or denied? He justifies his proceedings on the principle of expedience or necessity. He reasons on sound principles.

6. A general truth; a law comprehending many subordinate truths; as the principles of morality, of law, of government, &c.

7. Tenet; that which is believed, whether truth or not, but which serves as a rule of action or the basis of a system; as the principles of the Stoics, or of the Epicureans.

8. A principle of human nature, is a law of action in human beings; a constitutional propensity common to the human species. Thus it is a principle of human nature to resent injuries and repel insults.

PRIN'CIPLE, v.t. To establish or fix in tenets; to impress with any tenet, good or ill; chiefly used in the participle.

Men have been principled with an opinion, that they must not consult reason in things of religion.

1. To establish firmly in the mind.

PRIN'CI-PLE, n. [It. principio; Fr. principe; L. principium, beginning.]

  1. In a general sense, the cause, source or origin of any thing; that from which a thing proceeds; as, the principle of motion; the principles of action. – Dryden.
  2. Element; constituent part; primordial substance. Modern philosophers suppose matter to be one simple principle, or solid extension diversified by its various shapes. – Watts.
  3. Being that produces any thing; operative cause. The soul of man is an active principle. – Tillotson.
  4. In science, a truth admitted either without proof, or considered as having been before proved. In the former sense it is synonymous with axiom; in the latter, with the phrase, established principle.
  5. Ground; foundation; that which supports an assertion, an action, or a series of actions or of reasoning. On what principle can this be affirmed or denied? He justifies his proceedings on the principle of expedience or necessity. He reasons on sound principles.
  6. A general truth; a law comprehending many subordinate truths; as, the principles of morality, of law, of government, &c.
  7. Tenet; that which is believed, whether truth or not, but which serves as a rule of action or the basis of a system, the principles of the Stoics, or of the Epicureans.
  8. A principle of human nature, is a law of action in human beings; a constitutional propensity common to the human species. Thus it is a principle of human nature to resent injuries and repel insults.

PRIN'CI-PLE, v.t.

  1. To establish or fix in tenets; to impress with any tenet, good or ill; chiefly used in the participle. Men have been principled with an opinion, that they must not consult reason an things of religion. – Locke.
  2. To establish firmly in the mind. – Locke.

Prin"ci*ple
  1. Beginning; commencement.

    [Obs.]

    Doubting sad end of principle unsound. Spenser.

  2. To equip with principles] to establish, or fix, in certain principles; to impress with any tenet, or rule of conduct, good or ill.

    Governors should be well principled. L'Estrange.

    Let an enthusiast be principled that he or his teacher is inspired. Locke.

  3. A source, or origin; that from which anything proceeds; fundamental substance or energy; primordial substance; ultimate element, or cause.

    The soul of man is an active principle. Tillotson.

  4. An original faculty or endowment.

    Nature in your principles hath set [benignity]. Chaucer.

    Those active principles whose direct and ultimate object is the communication either of enjoyment or suffering. Stewart.

  5. A fundamental truth; a comprehensive law or doctrine, from which others are derived, or on which others are founded; a general truth; an elementary proposition; a maxim; an axiom; a postulate.

    Therefore, leaving the principles of the doctrine of Christ, let us go on unto perfection. Heb. vi. 1.

    A good principle, not rightly understood, may prove as hurtful as a bad. Milton.

  6. A settled rule of action; a governing law of conduct; an opinion or belief which exercises a directing influence on the life and behavior; a rule (usually, a right rule) of conduct consistently directing one's actions; as, a person of no principle.

    All kinds of dishonesty destroy our pretenses to an honest principle of mind. Law.

  7. Any original inherent constituent which characterizes a substance, or gives it its essential properties, and which can usually be separated by analysis; -- applied especially to drugs, plant extracts, etc.

    Cathartine is the bitter, purgative principle of senna. Gregory.

    Bitter principle, Principle of contradiction, etc. See under Bitter, Contradiction, etc.

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Principle

PRIN'CIPLE, noun [Latin principium, beginning.]

1. In a general sense, the cause, source or origin of any thing; that from which a thing proceeds; as the principle of motion; the principles of action.

2. Element; constituent part; primordial substance.

Modern philosophers suppose matter to be one simple principle or solid extension diversified by its various shapes.

3. Being that produces any thing; operative cause.

The soul of man is an active principle

4. In science, a truth admitted either without proof, or considered as having been before proved. In the former sense, it is synonymous with axiom; in the latter, with the phrase, established principle

5. Ground; foundation; that which supports an assertion, an action, or a series of actions or of reasoning. On what principle can this be affirmed or denied? He justifies his proceedings on the principle of expedience or necessity. He reasons on sound principles.

6. A general truth; a law comprehending many subordinate truths; as the principles of morality, of law, of government, etc.

7. Tenet; that which is believed, whether truth or not, but which serves as a rule of action or the basis of a system; as the principles of the Stoics, or of the Epicureans.

8. A principle of human nature, is a law of action in human beings; a constitutional propensity common to the human species. Thus it is a principle of human nature to resent injuries and repel insults.

PRIN'CIPLE, verb transitive To establish or fix in tenets; to impress with any tenet, good or ill; chiefly used in the participle.

Men have been principled with an opinion, that they must not consult reason in things of religion.

1. To establish firmly in the mind.

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Because of Noah Webster's chriastian faith and the fact that he used the bible to help him define the words. I use this in preparing bible teaching materials.

— John (Dunstable, Bed)

Word of the Day

principle

PRIN'CIPLE, n. [L. principium, beginning.]

1. In a general sense, the cause, source or origin of any thing; that from which a thing proceeds; as the principle of motion; the principles of action.

2. Element; constituent part; primordial substance.

Modern philosophers suppose matter to be one simple principle, or solid extension diversified by its various shapes.

3. Being that produces any thing; operative cause.

The soul of man is an active principle.

4. In science, a truth admitted either without proof, or considered as having been before proved. In the former sense, it is synonymous with axiom; in the latter, with the phrase, established principle.

5. Ground; foundation; that which supports an assertion, an action, or a series of actions or of reasoning. On what principle can this be affirmed or denied? He justifies his proceedings on the principle of expedience or necessity. He reasons on sound principles.

6. A general truth; a law comprehending many subordinate truths; as the principles of morality, of law, of government, &c.

7. Tenet; that which is believed, whether truth or not, but which serves as a rule of action or the basis of a system; as the principles of the Stoics, or of the Epicureans.

8. A principle of human nature, is a law of action in human beings; a constitutional propensity common to the human species. Thus it is a principle of human nature to resent injuries and repel insults.

PRIN'CIPLE, v.t. To establish or fix in tenets; to impress with any tenet, good or ill; chiefly used in the participle.

Men have been principled with an opinion, that they must not consult reason in things of religion.

1. To establish firmly in the mind.

Random Word

conglobed

CONGLOBED, pp. Collected into a ball.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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