HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Monday - July 22, 2024

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [flash]

0
0
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

flash

FLASH, n.

1. A sudden burst of light; a flood of light instantaneously appearing and disappearing; as a flash of lightning.

2. A sudden burst of flame and light; as instantaneous blaze; as the flash of a gun.

3. A sudden burst, as of wit or merriment; as a flash of wit; a flash of joy or mirth.

His companions recollect no instance of premature wit, no striking sentiment, no flash of fancy -

4. A short, transient state.

The Persians and Macedonians had it for a flash.

5. A body of water driven by violence. [Local.]

6. A little pool. [Local.]

FLASH, v.i.

1. To break forth, as a sudden flood of light; to burst or open instantly on the sight, as splendor. It differs from glitter, glisten and gleam in denoting a flood or wide extent of light. The latter words may express the issuing of light from a small object, or from a pencil of rays. A diamond may glitter or glisten, but it does not flash. Flash differs from other words also in denoting suddenness of appearance and disappearance.

2. To burst or break forth with a flood of flame and light; as, the powder flashed in the pan. Flashing differs from exploding or disploding, in not being accompanied with a loud report.

3. To burst out into any kind of violence.

Every hour he flashes into one gross crime or other.

4. To break out, as a sudden expression of wit, merriment or bright thought.

FLASH, v.t.

1. To strike up a body of water from the surface.

He rudely flashed the waves.

[In this sense I believe this word is not used in America.]
2. To strike or to throw like a burst of light; as, to flash conviction on the mind.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [flash]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

FLASH, n.

1. A sudden burst of light; a flood of light instantaneously appearing and disappearing; as a flash of lightning.

2. A sudden burst of flame and light; as instantaneous blaze; as the flash of a gun.

3. A sudden burst, as of wit or merriment; as a flash of wit; a flash of joy or mirth.

His companions recollect no instance of premature wit, no striking sentiment, no flash of fancy -

4. A short, transient state.

The Persians and Macedonians had it for a flash.

5. A body of water driven by violence. [Local.]

6. A little pool. [Local.]

FLASH, v.i.

1. To break forth, as a sudden flood of light; to burst or open instantly on the sight, as splendor. It differs from glitter, glisten and gleam in denoting a flood or wide extent of light. The latter words may express the issuing of light from a small object, or from a pencil of rays. A diamond may glitter or glisten, but it does not flash. Flash differs from other words also in denoting suddenness of appearance and disappearance.

2. To burst or break forth with a flood of flame and light; as, the powder flashed in the pan. Flashing differs from exploding or disploding, in not being accompanied with a loud report.

3. To burst out into any kind of violence.

Every hour he flashes into one gross crime or other.

4. To break out, as a sudden expression of wit, merriment or bright thought.

FLASH, v.t.

1. To strike up a body of water from the surface.

He rudely flashed the waves.

[In this sense I believe this word is not used in America.]
2. To strike or to throw like a burst of light; as, to flash conviction on the mind.

FLASH, n. [Ir. lasair, lasrach, a flame, a flash; lasadh, lasaim, to burn, to kindle; leos, light; leosam, to give light; also, loisgim, losgadh, to burn; loisi, flame; Dan. lys, light; lyser, to shine, to glisten or glister; Sw. lius, lysa, id. Qu. G. blitz, a glance; blitzen, to lighten, to flash; Russ. blesk, bleschu, id. There is a numerous class of words in Ls, with different prefixes, that denote to shine, to throw light, as gloss, glass, glisten, blush, flush, flash, luster, &c.; but perhaps they are not all of one family. The Welsh has llathru, to make smooth and glossy, to polish, to glitter; llethrid, a gleam, a flash. See Class Ld, No. 5, and Ls, No. 25, and see Flush.]

  1. A sudden burst of light; a flood of light instantaneously appearing and disappearing; as, a flash of lightning.
  2. A sudden burst of flame and light; an instantaneous blaze; as, the flash of a gun.
  3. A sudden burst, as of wit or merriment; as, a flash of wit; a flash of joy or mirth. His companions recollect no instance of premature wit, no striking sentiment, no flash of fancy. Wirt.
  4. A short, transient state. The Persians and Macedonians had it for a flash. Bacon.
  5. A body of water driven by violence. [Local.] Pegge.
  6. A little pool. Qu. plash. [Local.]

FLASH, v.i.

  1. To break forth, as a sudden flood of light; to burst or open instantly on the sight, as splendor. It differs from glitter, glisten and gleam, in denoting a flood or wide extent of light. The latter words may express the issuing of light from a small object, or from a pencil of rays. A diamond may glitter or glisten, but it does not flash. Flash differs from other words also in denoting suddenness of appearance and disappearance.
  2. To burst or break forth with a flood of flame and light; as, the powder flashed in the pan. Flashing differs from exploding or disploding, in not being accompanied with a loud report.
  3. To burst out into any kind of violence. Every hour He flashes into one gross crime or other. Shak.
  4. To break out, as a sudden expression of wit, merriment, or bright thought. Felton.

FLASH, v.t.

  1. To strike up a body of water from the surface. Carew. He rudely flashed the waves. Spenser. [In this sense I believe this word is not used in America.]
  2. To strike or to throw like a burst of light; as, to flash conviction on the mind.

Flash
  1. To burst or break forth with a sudden and transient flood of flame and light] as, the lighting flashes vividly; the powder flashed.
  2. To send out in flashes; to cause to burst forth with sudden flame or light.

    The chariot of paternal Deity,
    Flashing thick flames.
    Milton.

  3. A sudden burst of light; a flood of light instantaneously appearing and disappearing; a momentary blaze; as, a flash of lightning.
  4. Showy, but counterfeit; cheap, pretentious, and vulgar; as, flash jewelry; flash finery.
  5. Slang or cant of thieves and prostitutes.
  6. A pool.

    [Prov. Eng.] Haliwell.
  7. To break forth, as a sudden flood of light; to burst instantly and brightly on the sight; to show a momentary brilliancy; to come or pass like a flash.

    Names which have flashed and thundered as the watch words of unnumbered struggles. Talfourd.

    The object is made to flash upon the eye of the mind. M. Arnold.

    A thought flashed through me, which I clothed in act. Tennyson.

  8. To convey as by a flash; to light up, as by a sudden flame or light; as, to flash a message along the wires; to flash conviction on the mind.
  9. A sudden and brilliant burst, as of wit or genius; a momentary brightness or show.

    The flash and outbreak of a fiery mind. Shak.

    No striking sentiment, no flash of fancy. Wirt.

  10. Wearing showy, counterfeit ornaments; vulgarly pretentious; as, flash people; flash men or women; -- applied especially to thieves, gamblers, and prostitutes that dress in a showy way and wear much cheap jewelry.

    Flash house, a house frequented by flash people, as thieves and whores; hence, a brothel. "A gang of footpads, reveling with their favorite beauties at a flash house." Macaulay.

  11. A reservoir and sluiceway beside a navigable stream, just above a shoal, so that the stream may pour in water as boats pass, and thus bear them over the shoal.

    Flash wheel (Mech.), a paddle wheel made to revolve in a breast or curved water way, by which water is lifted from the lower to the higher level.

  12. To burst forth like a sudden flame; to break out violently; to rush hastily.

    Every hour
    He flashes into one gross crime or other.
    Shak.

    To flash in the pan, to fail of success. [Colloq.] See under Flash, a burst of light. Bartlett.

    Syn. -- Flash, Glitter, Gleam, Glisten, Glister. Flash differs from glitter and gleam, denoting a flood or wide extent of light. The latter words may express the issuing of light from a small object, or from a pencil of rays. Flash differs from other words, also, in denoting suddenness of appearance and disappearance. Flashing differs from exploding or disploding in not being accompanied with a loud report. To glisten, or glister, is to shine with a soft and fitful luster, as eyes suffused with tears, or flowers wet with dew.

  13. To cover with a thin layer, as objects of glass with glass of a different color. See Flashing, n., 3 (b).
  14. The time during which a flash is visible; an instant; a very brief period.

    The Persians and Macedonians had it for a flash. Bacon.

  15. To trick up in a showy manner.

    Limning and flashing it with various dyes. A. Brewer.

  16. A preparation of capsicum, burnt sugar, etc., for coloring and giving a fictitious strength to liquors.

    Flash light, or Flashing light, a kind of light shown by lighthouses, produced by the revolution of reflectors, so as to show a flash of light every few seconds, alternating with periods of dimness. Knight. -- Flash in the pan, the flashing of the priming in the pan of a flintlock musket without discharging the piece; hence, sudden, spasmodic effort that accomplishes nothing.

  17. To strike and throw up large bodies of water from the surface; to splash.

    [Obs.]

    He rudely flashed the waves about. Spenser.

    Flashed glass. See Flashing, n., 3.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

137

898

103

973

171

1003
Flash

FLASH, noun

1. A sudden burst of light; a flood of light instantaneously appearing and disappearing; as a flash of lightning.

2. A sudden burst of flame and light; as instantaneous blaze; as the flash of a gun.

3. A sudden burst, as of wit or merriment; as a flash of wit; a flash of joy or mirth.

His companions recollect no instance of premature wit, no striking sentiment, no flash of fancy -

4. A short, transient state.

The Persians and Macedonians had it for a flash

5. A body of water driven by violence. [Local.]

6. A little pool. [Local.]

FLASH, verb intransitive

1. To break forth, as a sudden flood of light; to burst or open instantly on the sight, as splendor. It differs from glitter, glisten and gleam in denoting a flood or wide extent of light. The latter words may express the issuing of light from a small object, or from a pencil of rays. A diamond may glitter or glisten, but it does not flash flash differs from other words also in denoting suddenness of appearance and disappearance.

2. To burst or break forth with a flood of flame and light; as, the powder flashed in the pan. Flashing differs from exploding or disploding, in not being accompanied with a loud report.

3. To burst out into any kind of violence.

Every hour he flashes into one gross crime or other.

4. To break out, as a sudden expression of wit, merriment or bright thought.

FLASH, verb transitive

1. To strike up a body of water from the surface.

He rudely flashed the waves.

[In this sense I believe this word is not used in America.]

2. To strike or to throw like a burst of light; as, to flash conviction on the mind.

Why 1828?

0
1
 


Noah Webster is one of the most influential men in American educational history, and his dictionary should be utilized on a daily basis by anyone who desires to know the true meaning of the words contained therein it.

— Justin (Dover, FL)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

skull

SKULL, n.

1. The bone that forms the exterior of the head, and incloses the brain; the brain-pan. It is composed of several parts united at the sutures.

2. A person.

Skulls that cannot teach and will not learn.

3. Skull, for skeal or school, of fish

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

332

517

Compact Edition

318

222

CD-ROM

271

184

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 0.238 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top