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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [fling]

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fling

FLING, v.t. pret. and pp. flung. [L. lego legare.]

1. To cast, send or throw from the hand; to hurl; as, to fling a stone at a bird.

Tis fate that flings the dice; and as she flings,

Of kings makes peasants, and of peasants, kings.

2. To dart; to cast with violence; to send forth.

He - like Jove, his lightning flung.

3. To send forth; to emit; to scatter.

Every beam new transient colors flings.

4. To throw; to drive by violence.

5. To throw to the ground; to prostrate.

The wrestler flung his antagonist.

6. To baffle; to defeat; as, to fling a party in litigation.

To fling away, to reject; to discard.

Cromwell, I charge thee, fling away ambition.

1. To fling down, to demolish; to ruin.

2. To throw to the ground.

To fling out, to utter; to speak; as, to fling out hard words against another.

To fling off, to baffle in the chase, to defeat of prey.

To fling in, to throw in; to make an allowance or deduction, or not to charge in an account. In settling accounts, one party flings in a small sum, or a few days work.

To fling open, to throw open; to open suddenly or with violence; as, to fling open a door.

To fling up, to relinquish; to abandon; as, to fling up a design.

FLING, v.i.

1. To flounce; to wince; to fly into violent and irregular motions. The horse began to kick and fling.

2. To cast in the teeth; to utter harsh language; to sneer; to upbraid. The scold began to flout and fling.

To fling out, to grow unruly or outrageous.

FLING, n.

1. A throw; a cast from the hand.

2. A gibe; a sneer; a sarcasm; a severe or contemptuous remark.

I, who love to have a fling,

Both at senate house and king.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [fling]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

FLING, v.t. pret. and pp. flung. [L. lego legare.]

1. To cast, send or throw from the hand; to hurl; as, to fling a stone at a bird.

Tis fate that flings the dice; and as she flings,

Of kings makes peasants, and of peasants, kings.

2. To dart; to cast with violence; to send forth.

He - like Jove, his lightning flung.

3. To send forth; to emit; to scatter.

Every beam new transient colors flings.

4. To throw; to drive by violence.

5. To throw to the ground; to prostrate.

The wrestler flung his antagonist.

6. To baffle; to defeat; as, to fling a party in litigation.

To fling away, to reject; to discard.

Cromwell, I charge thee, fling away ambition.

1. To fling down, to demolish; to ruin.

2. To throw to the ground.

To fling out, to utter; to speak; as, to fling out hard words against another.

To fling off, to baffle in the chase, to defeat of prey.

To fling in, to throw in; to make an allowance or deduction, or not to charge in an account. In settling accounts, one party flings in a small sum, or a few days work.

To fling open, to throw open; to open suddenly or with violence; as, to fling open a door.

To fling up, to relinquish; to abandon; as, to fling up a design.

FLING, v.i.

1. To flounce; to wince; to fly into violent and irregular motions. The horse began to kick and fling.

2. To cast in the teeth; to utter harsh language; to sneer; to upbraid. The scold began to flout and fling.

To fling out, to grow unruly or outrageous.

FLING, n.

1. A throw; a cast from the hand.

2. A gibe; a sneer; a sarcasm; a severe or contemptuous remark.

I, who love to have a fling,

Both at senate house and king.

FLING, n.

  1. A throw; a cast from the hand.
  2. A gibe; a sneer; a sarcasm; a severe or contemptuous remark. – I, who love to have a fling, / Both at senate house and king. – Swift.

FLING, v.i.

  1. To flounce; to wince; to fly into violent and irregular motions. The horse began to kick and fling.
  2. To cast in the teeth; to utter harsh language; to sneer; to upbraid. The scold began to flout and fling. To fling out, to grow unruly or outrageous. Shak.

FLING, v.t. [pret. and pp. flung. Ir. lingim; to fling, to dart, to fly off, to skip. If n is not radical, as I suppose, this may be the W. lluciaw, to fling, to throw, to dart, and L. lego, legare.]

  1. To cast, send or throw from the hand; to hurl; as, to fling a stone at a bird. 'Tis fate that flings the dice; and as she flings, / Of kings makes peasants, and of peasants, kings. Dryden.
  2. To dart; to cast with violence; to send forth. He – like Jove, his lightning flung. Dryden.
  3. To send forth; to emit; to scatter. Every beam new transient colors flings. Pope.
  4. To throw; to drive by violence.
  5. To throw to the ground; to prostrate. The wrestler flung his antagonist.
  6. To baffle; to defeat; as, to fling a party in litigation. To fling away, to reject; to discard. Cromwell, I charge thee, fling away ambition. Shak. To fling down, to demolish; to ruin. #2. To throw to the ground. To fling off, to baffle in the chase; to defeat of prey. Addison. To fling out, to utter; to speak; as, to fling out hard words against another. To fling in, to throw in; to make an allowance or deduction, or not to charge in an account. In settling accounts, one party flings in a small sum, or a few days work. To fling open, to throw open; to open suddenly or with violence; as, to fling open a door. To fling up, to relinquish; to abandon; as, to fling up a design.

Fling
  1. To cast, send, to throw from the hand; to hurl; to dart; to emit with violence as if thrown from the hand; as, to fing a stone into the pond.

    'T is Fate that flings the dice: and, as she flings,
    Of kings makes peasants, and of peasants kings.
    Dryden.

    He . . . like Jove, his lighting flung. Dryden.

    I know thy generous temper well.
    Fling but the appearance of dishonor on it,
    It straight takes fire.
    Addison.

  2. To throw; to wince; to flounce; as, the horse began to kick and fling.
  3. A cast from the hand; a throw; also, a flounce; a kick; as, the fling of a horse.
  4. To shed forth; to emit; to scatter.

    The sun begins to fling
    His flaring beams.
    Milton.

    Every beam new transient colors flings. Pope.

  5. To cast in the teeth; to utter abusive language; to sneer; as, the scold began to flout and fling.
  6. A severe or contemptuous remark; an expression of sarcastic scorn; a gibe; a sarcasm.

    I, who love to have a fling,
    Both at senate house and king.
    Swift.

  7. To throw; to hurl; to throw off or down; to prostrate; hence, to baffle; to defeat; as, to fling a party in litigation.

    His horse started, flung him, and fell upon him. Walpole.

    To fling about, to throw on all sides; to scatter. -- To fling away, to reject; to discard.

    Cromwell, I charge thee, fling away ambition. Shak.

    --To fling down. (a) To throw to the ground; esp., to throw in defiance, as formerly knights cast a glove into the arena as a challenge.

    This question so flung down before the guests, . . .
    Was handed over by consent of all
    To me who had not spoken.
    Tennyson.

    (b) To overturn; to demolish; to ruin. -- To fling in, to throw in; not to charge in an account; as, in settling accounts, one party flings in a small sum, or a few days' work. -- To fling off, to baffle in the chase; to defeat of prey; also, to get rid of. Addison. -- To fling open, to throw open; to open suddenly or with violence; as, to fling open a door. -- To fling out, to utter; to speak in an abrupt or harsh manner; as, to fling out hard words against another. -- To fling up, to relinquish; to abandon; as, to fling up a design.

  8. To throw one's self in a violent or hasty manner; to rush or spring with violence or haste.

    And crop-full, out of doors he flings. Milton.

    I flung closer to his breast,
    As sword that, after battle, flings to sheath.
    Mrs. Browning.

    To fling out, to become ugly and intractable; to utter sneers and insinuations.

  9. A kind of dance; as, the Highland fling.
  10. A trifing matter; an object of contempt.

    [Obs.]

    England were but a fling
    Save for the crooked stick and the gray goose wing.
    Old Proverb.

    To have one's fling, to enjoy one's self to the full; to have a season of dissipation. J. H. Newman. "When I was as young as you, I had my fling. I led a life of pleasure." D. Jerrold.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Fling

FLING, verb transitive preterit tense and participle passive flung. [Latin lego legare.]

1. To cast, send or throw from the hand; to hurl; as, to fling a stone at a bird.

Tis fate that flings the dice; and as she flings,

Of kings makes peasants, and of peasants, kings.

2. To dart; to cast with violence; to send forth.

He - like Jove, his lightning flung.

3. To send forth; to emit; to scatter.

Every beam new transient colors flings.

4. To throw; to drive by violence.

5. To throw to the ground; to prostrate.

The wrestler flung his antagonist.

6. To baffle; to defeat; as, to fling a party in litigation.

To fling away, to reject; to discard.

Cromwell, I charge thee, fling away ambition.

1. To fling down, to demolish; to ruin.

2. To throw to the ground.

To fling out, to utter; to speak; as, to fling out hard words against another.

To fling off, to baffle in the chase, to defeat of prey.

To fling in, to throw in; to make an allowance or deduction, or not to charge in an account. In settling accounts, one party flings in a small sum, or a few days work.

To fling open, to throw open; to open suddenly or with violence; as, to fling open a door.

To fling up, to relinquish; to abandon; as, to fling up a design.

FLING, verb intransitive

1. To flounce; to wince; to fly into violent and irregular motions. The horse began to kick and fling

2. To cast in the teeth; to utter harsh language; to sneer; to upbraid. The scold began to flout and fling

To fling out, to grow unruly or outrageous.

FLING, noun

1. A throw; a cast from the hand.

2. A gibe; a sneer; a sarcasm; a severe or contemptuous remark.

I, who love to have a fling

Both at senate house and king.

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Biblical definitions

— Russell (Statham, GA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

dignity

DIGNITY, n. [L., worthy.]

1. True honor; nobleness or elevation of mind, consisting in a high sense of propriety, truth and justice, with an abhorrence of mean and sinful actions; opposed to meanness. In this sense, we speak of the dignity of mind, and dignity of sentiments. This dignity is based on moral rectitude; all vice is incompatible with true dignity of mind. The man who deliberately injures another, whether male or female, has no true dignity of soul.

2. Elevation; honorable place or rank of elevation; degree of excellence, either in estimation, or in the order of nature. Man is superior in dignity to brutes.

3. Elevation of aspect; grandeur of mein; as a man of native dignity.

4. Elevation of deportment; as dignity of manners or behavior.

5. An elevated office, civil or ecclesiastical, giving a high rank in society; advancement; preferment, or the rank attached to it. We say, a man enjoys his dignity with moderation, or without haughtiness. Among ecclesiastics, dignity is office or preferment joined with power or jurisdiction.

6. The rank or title of a nobleman.

7. In oratory, one of the three parts of elocution, consisting in the right use of tropes and figures.

8. In astrology, an advantage which a planet has on account of its being in some particular place of the zodiac, or in a particular station in respect to other planets.

9. A general maxim, or principle. [Not used.]

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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