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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [float]

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float

FLOAT, n.

1. That which swims or is borne on water; as a float of weeds and rushes. But particularly, a body or collection of timber, boards or planks fastened together and conveyed down a stream; a raft. [The latter word is more generally used in the United States.]

2. The cork or quill used on an angling line, to support it and discover the bite of a fish.

3. The act of flowing; flux; flood; the primary sense, but obsolete.

4. A quantity of earth, eighteen feet square and one deep.

5. A wave. [L. fuctus.]

FLOAT, v.i. [L. fluo, to flow.]

1. To be borne or sustained on the surface of a fluid; to swim; to be buoyed up; not to sink; not to be aground. We say, the water is so shallow, the ship will not float.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [float]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

FLOAT, n.

1. That which swims or is borne on water; as a float of weeds and rushes. But particularly, a body or collection of timber, boards or planks fastened together and conveyed down a stream; a raft. [The latter word is more generally used in the United States.]

2. The cork or quill used on an angling line, to support it and discover the bite of a fish.

3. The act of flowing; flux; flood; the primary sense, but obsolete.

4. A quantity of earth, eighteen feet square and one deep.

5. A wave. [L. fuctus.]

FLOAT, v.i. [L. fluo, to flow.]

1. To be borne or sustained on the surface of a fluid; to swim; to be buoyed up; not to sink; not to be aground. We say, the water is so shallow, the ship will not float.

FLOAT, n. [Sax. flota; G. floss; D. vlot, vloot; Dan. flode; Sw. flotte; Fr. flotte; Sp. flota; It. flotta; Russ. plot.]

  1. That which swims or is borne on water; as, a float of weeds and rushes. But particularly, a body or collection of timber, boards or planks, fastened together and conveyed down a stream; a raft. [The latter word is more generally used in the United States.]
  2. The cork or quill used on an angling line, to support it and discover the bite of a fish. – Encyc. Walton.
  3. The act of flowing; flux; flood; the primary sense, but obsolete. – Hooker.
  4. A quantity of earth, eighteen feet square and one deep. – Mortimer.
  5. A wave. [French flot; L. fluctus.]

FLOAT, v.i. [Sax. fleotan, flotan; G. flössen; D. vlooten, vlotten; Fr. flotter; Dan. flöder. Either from the noun, or from the root of the L. fluo, to flow.]

  1. To be borne or sustained on the surface of a fluid; to swim; to be buoyed up; not to sink; not to be aground. We say, the water is so shallow, the ship will not float.
  2. To move or be conveyed on water; to swim. The raft floats flown the river. Three blustering nights, borne by the southern blast / I floated. – Dryden.
  3. To be buoyed up and moved or conveyed in a fluid, as in air. They stretch their plumes and float upon the wind. Pope.
  4. To move with a light irregular course. Qu. Locke.

FLOAT, v.t.

  1. To cause to pass by swimming; to cause to be conveyed on water. The tide floated the ship into the harbor.
  2. To flood; to inundate; to overflow; to cover with water. Proud Pactolus floats the fruitful lands. Dryden.

Float
  1. Anything which floats or rests on the surface of a fluid, as to sustain weight, or to indicate the height of the surface, or mark the place of, something.

    Specifically: (a)
  2. To rest on the surface of any fluid; to swim; to be buoyed up.

    The ark no more now floats, but seems on ground. Milton.

    Three blustering nights, borne by the southern blast,
    I floated.
    Dryden.

  3. To cause to float; to cause to rest or move on the surface of a fluid; as, the tide floated the ship into the harbor.

    Had floated that bell on the Inchcape rock. Southey.

  4. A float board. See Float board (below).
  5. To move quietly or gently on the water, as a raft; to drift along; to move or glide without effort or impulse on the surface of a fluid, or through the air.

    They stretch their broad plumes and float upon the wind. Pope.

    There seems a floating whisper on the hills. Byron.

  6. To flood; to overflow; to cover with water.

    Proud Pactolus floats the fruitful lands. Dryden.

  7. A contrivance for affording a copious stream of water to the heated surface of an object of large bulk, as an anvil or die.

    Knight.
  8. To pass over and level the surface of with a float while the plastering is kept wet.
  9. The act of flowing; flux; flow.

    [Obs.] Bacon.
  10. To support and sustain the credit of, as a commercial scheme or a joint-stock company, so as to enable it to go into, or continue in, operation.
  11. A quantity of earth, eighteen feet square and one foot deep.

    [Obs.] Mortimer.
  12. The trowel or tool with which the floated coat of plastering is leveled and smoothed.
  13. A polishing block used in marble working; a runner.

    Knight.
  14. A single-cut file for smoothing; a tool used by shoemakers for rasping off pegs inside a shoe.
  15. A coal cart.

    [Eng.] Simmonds.
  16. The sea; a wave. See Flote, n.

    Float board, one of the boards fixed radially to the rim of an undershot water wheel or of a steamer's paddle wheel; -- a vane. -- Float case (Naut.), a caisson used for lifting a ship. -- Float copper or gold (Mining), fine particles of metallic copper or of gold suspended in water, and thus liable to be lost. -- Float ore, water-worn particles of ore; fragments of vein material found on the surface, away from the vein outcrop. Raymond. -- Float stone (Arch.), a siliceous stone used to rub stonework or brickwork to a smooth surface. -- Float valve, a valve or cock acted upon by a float. See Float, 1 (b).

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Float

FLOAT, noun

1. That which swims or is borne on water; as a float of weeds and rushes. But particularly, a body or collection of timber, boards or planks fastened together and conveyed down a stream; a raft. [The latter word is more generally used in the United States.]

2. The cork or quill used on an angling line, to support it and discover the bite of a fish.

3. The act of flowing; flux; flood; the primary sense, but obsolete.

4. A quantity of earth, eighteen feet square and one deep.

5. A wave. [Latin fuctus.]

FLOAT, verb intransitive [Latin fluo, to flow.]

1. To be borne or sustained on the surface of a fluid; to swim; to be buoyed up; not to sink; not to be aground. We say, the water is so shallow, the ship will not float

2. To move or be conveyed on water; to swim. The raft floats down the river.

Three blustering nights, borne by the southern blast, I floated.

3. To be buoyed up and moved or conveyed in a fluid, as in air.

They stretch their plumes and float upon the wind.

4. To move with a light irregular course.

FLOAT, verb transitive

1. To cause to pass by swimming; to cause to be conveyed on water. The tide floated the ship into the harbor.

2. To flood; to inundate; to overflow; to cover with water.

Proud Pactolus floats the fruitful lands.

Why 1828?

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because of it's biblical references

— Dan (Aurora, CO)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

constancy

CONSTANCY, n. [L., to stand.]

1. Fixedness; a standing firm; hence, applied to God or his works, immutability; unalterable continuance; a permanent state.

2. Fixedness or firmness of mind; persevering resolution; steady, unshaken determination; particularly applicable to firmness of mind under sufferings, to steadiness in attachments, and to perseverence in enterprise. Lasting affection; stability in love or friendship.

3. Certainty; veracity; reality.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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monte

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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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