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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [lodge]

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lodge

LODGE, v.t.

1. To set, lay or deposit for keeping or preservation, for a longer or shorter time. The men lodged their arms in the arsenal.

2. To place; to plant; to infix.

He lodged an arrow in a tender breast.

3. To fix; to settle in the heart, mind or memory.

I can give no reason more than a lodged hate -

4. To furnish with a temporary habitation, or with an accommodation for a night. He lodged the prince a month, a week, or a night. [The word usually denotes a short residence, but for no definite time.]

5. To harbor; to cover. The deer is lodged.

6. To afford place to; to contain for keeping.

The memory can lodge a greater store of images, than the senses can present at one time.

7. To throw in or on; as, to lodge a ball or a bomb in a fort.

8. To throw down; to lay flat.

Our sighs, and they shall lodge the summer corn.

LODGE, v.i.

1. To reside; to dwell; to rest in a place.

And lodge such daring souls in little men.

2. To rest or dwell for a time, as for a night, a week, a month. We lodged a night at the Golden Ball. We lodged a week at the City Hotel. Soldiers lodge in tents in summer, and in huts in winter. Fowls lodge on trees or rocks.

3. To fall flat, as grain. Wheat and oats on strong land are apt to lodge.

LODGE, n.

1. A small house in a park or forest, for a temporary place of rest at night; a temporary habitation; a hut.

2. A small house or tenement appended to a larger; as a porter's lodge.

3. A den; a cave; any place where a wild beast dwells.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [lodge]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

LODGE, v.t.

1. To set, lay or deposit for keeping or preservation, for a longer or shorter time. The men lodged their arms in the arsenal.

2. To place; to plant; to infix.

He lodged an arrow in a tender breast.

3. To fix; to settle in the heart, mind or memory.

I can give no reason more than a lodged hate -

4. To furnish with a temporary habitation, or with an accommodation for a night. He lodged the prince a month, a week, or a night. [The word usually denotes a short residence, but for no definite time.]

5. To harbor; to cover. The deer is lodged.

6. To afford place to; to contain for keeping.

The memory can lodge a greater store of images, than the senses can present at one time.

7. To throw in or on; as, to lodge a ball or a bomb in a fort.

8. To throw down; to lay flat.

Our sighs, and they shall lodge the summer corn.

LODGE, v.i.

1. To reside; to dwell; to rest in a place.

And lodge such daring souls in little men.

2. To rest or dwell for a time, as for a night, a week, a month. We lodged a night at the Golden Ball. We lodged a week at the City Hotel. Soldiers lodge in tents in summer, and in huts in winter. Fowls lodge on trees or rocks.

3. To fall flat, as grain. Wheat and oats on strong land are apt to lodge.

LODGE, n.

1. A small house in a park or forest, for a temporary place of rest at night; a temporary habitation; a hut.

2. A small house or tenement appended to a larger; as a porter's lodge.

3. A den; a cave; any place where a wild beast dwells.

LODGE, n.

  1. A small house in a park or forest, for a temporary place of rest at night; a temporary habitation; a hut. – Sidney. Shak.
  2. A small house or tenement appended to a larger; as, a porter's lodge.
  3. A den; a cave; any place where a wild beast dwells.

LODGE, v.i.

  1. To reside; to dwell; to rest in a place. And lodge such daring souls in little men. – Pope.
  2. To rest or dwell for a time, as for a night, a week, a month. We lodged a night at the Golden Ball. We lodged a week at the City Hotel. Soldiers lodge in tents in summer, and in huts in winter. Fowls lodge on trees or rocks.
  3. To fall flat, as grain. Wheat and oats on strong land are apt to lodge.

LODGE, v.t. [Fr. loger, to lodge; It. loggia, a lodge; alloggiare, to lodge; Sp. alojar; Arm. logea; Dan. logerer. The sense is to set or throw down. In Sax. logian is to compose, to deposit or lay up, also to repair; Russ. loju, to lay, to put. It is probably allied to lay.]

  1. To set, lay or deposit for keeping or preservation, for a longer or shorter time. The men lodged their arms in the arsenal.
  2. To place; to plant; to infix. He lodged an arrow in a tender breast. – Addison.
  3. To fix; to settle in the heart, mind or memory. I can give no reason / More than a lodged hate. – Shak.
  4. To furnish with a temporary habitation, or with an accommodation for a night. He lodged the prince a month, a week, or a night. [The word usually notes a short residence, but for no definite time.]
  5. To harbor; to covet. The deer is lodged. – Addison.
  6. To afford place to; to contain for keeping. The memory can lodge a greater store of images, than the senses can present at one time. – Cheyne.
  7. To throw in or on; as, to lodge a ball or a bomb in a fort.
  8. To throw down; to lay flat. Our sights, and they shall lodge the summer corn. – Shak.

Lodge
  1. A shelter in which one may rest;

    as: (a)
  2. To rest or remain a lodge house, or other shelter; to rest; to stay; to abide; esp., to sleep at night; as, to lodge in York Street.

    Chaucer.

    Stay and lodge by me this night. Shak.

    Something holy lodges in that breast. Milton.

  3. To give shelter or rest to; especially, to furnish a sleeping place for; to harbor; to shelter; hence, to receive; to hold.

    Every house was proud to lodge a knight. Dryden.

    The memory can lodge a greater store of images than all the senses can present at one time. Cheyne.

  4. The space at the mouth of a level next the shaft, widened to permit wagons to pass, or ore to be deposited for hoisting; -- called also platt.

    Raymond.
  5. To fall or lie down, as grass or grain, when overgrown or beaten down by the wind.

    Mortimer.
  6. To drive to shelter; to track to covert.

    The deer is lodged; I have tracked her to her covert. Addison.

  7. A collection of objects lodged together.

    The Maldives, a famous lodge of islands. De Foe.

  8. To come to a rest; to stop and remain; as, the bullet lodged in the bark of a tree.
  9. To deposit for keeping or preservation; as, the men lodged their arms in the arsenal.
  10. A family of North American Indians, or the persons who usually occupy an Indian lodge, -- as a unit of enumeration, reckoned from four to six persons; as, the tribe consists of about two hundred lodges, that is, of about a thousand individuals.

    Lodge gate, a park gate, or entrance gate, near the lodge. See Lodge, n., 1 (b).

  11. To cause to stop or rest in; to implant.

    He lodged an arrow in a tender breast. Addison.

  12. To lay down; to prostrate.

    Though bladed corn be lodged, and trees blown down. Shak.

    To lodge an information, to enter a formal complaint.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Lodge

LODGE, verb transitive

1. To set, lay or deposit for keeping or preservation, for a longer or shorter time. The men lodged their arms in the arsenal.

2. To place; to plant; to infix.

He lodged an arrow in a tender breast.

3. To fix; to settle in the heart, mind or memory.

I can give no reason more than a lodged hate -

4. To furnish with a temporary habitation, or with an accommodation for a night. He lodged the prince a month, a week, or a night. [The word usually denotes a short residence, but for no definite time.]

5. To harbor; to cover. The deer is lodged.

6. To afford place to; to contain for keeping.

The memory can lodge a greater store of images, than the senses can present at one time.

7. To throw in or on; as, to lodge a ball or a bomb in a fort.

8. To throw down; to lay flat.

Our sighs, and they shall lodge the summer corn.

LODGE, verb intransitive

1. To reside; to dwell; to rest in a place.

And lodge such daring souls in little men.

2. To rest or dwell for a time, as for a night, a week, a month. We lodged a night at the Golden Ball. We lodged a week at the City Hotel. Soldiers lodge in tents in summer, and in huts in winter. Fowls lodge on trees or rocks.

3. To fall flat, as grain. Wheat and oats on strong land are apt to lodge

LODGE, noun

1. A small house in a park or forest, for a temporary place of rest at night; a temporary habitation; a hut.

2. A small house or tenement appended to a larger; as a porter's lodge

3. A den; a cave; any place where a wild beast dwells.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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undispensing

UNDISPENS'ING, a. Not allowing to be dispensed with.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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