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Tuesday - January 23, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [pace]

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pace

PACE, n. [L., to open, Gr., to tread. See Pass.]

1. A step.

2. The space between the two feet in walking, estimated at two feet and a half. But the geometrical pace is five feet, or the whole space passed over by the same foot from one step to another. Sixty thousand such paces make one degree on the equator.

3. Manner of walking; a gait; as a languishing pace; a heavy pace; a quick or slow pace.

4. Step; gradation in business. [Little used.]

5. A mode of stepping among horses, in which the legs on the same side are lifted together. In a general sense, the word may be applied to any other mode of stepping.

6. Degree of celerity. Let him mend his pace.

To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow, creeps in this petty pace from day to day--

To keep or hold pace, to keep up; to go or move as fast as something else.

PACE, v.i.

1. To go; to walk; to move.

2. To go, move or walk slowly.

3. To move by lifting the legs on the same side together, as a horse.

PACE, v.t.

1. To measure by steps; as, to pace a piece of ground.

2. To regulate in motion.

If you ca, pace your wisdom in that good path that I would wish it go--



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [pace]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

PACE, n. [L., to open, Gr., to tread. See Pass.]

1. A step.

2. The space between the two feet in walking, estimated at two feet and a half. But the geometrical pace is five feet, or the whole space passed over by the same foot from one step to another. Sixty thousand such paces make one degree on the equator.

3. Manner of walking; a gait; as a languishing pace; a heavy pace; a quick or slow pace.

4. Step; gradation in business. [Little used.]

5. A mode of stepping among horses, in which the legs on the same side are lifted together. In a general sense, the word may be applied to any other mode of stepping.

6. Degree of celerity. Let him mend his pace.

To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow, creeps in this petty pace from day to day--

To keep or hold pace, to keep up; to go or move as fast as something else.

PACE, v.i.

1. To go; to walk; to move.

2. To go, move or walk slowly.

3. To move by lifting the legs on the same side together, as a horse.

PACE, v.t.

1. To measure by steps; as, to pace a piece of ground.

2. To regulate in motion.

If you ca, pace your wisdom in that good path that I would wish it go--

PACE, n. [Fr. pas; It. passo; Sp. paso; L. passus, from pando, to open, or Gr. πατεω, to tread. See Pass.]

  1. A step.
  2. The space between the two feet in walking, estimated at two feet and a half. But the geometrical pace is five feet, or the whole space passed over by the same foot from one step to another. Sixty thousand such paces make one degree on the equator. – Encyc.
  3. Manner of walking; gait; as, a languishing pace; a heavy pace; a quick or slow pace. – Addison.
  4. Step; gradation in business. [Little used.] – Temple.
  5. A mode of stepping among horses, in which the legs on the same side are lifted together. In a general sense, the word may be applied to any other mode of stepping.
  6. Degree of celerity. Let him mend his pace. To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day. – Shak. To keep or hold pace, to keep up; to go or move as fast as something else.

PACE, v.i.

  1. To go; to walk; to move. – Spenser. Shak.
  2. To go, move or walk slowly.
  3. To move by lifting the legs on the same side together, as a horse.

PACE, v.t.

  1. To measure by steps; as, to pace a piece of ground.
  2. To regulate in motion. If you can, pace your wisdom / In that good path that I would wish it go. – Shak.

Pace
  1. A single movement from one foot to the other in walking; a step.
  2. To go] to walk; specifically, to move with regular or measured steps.

    "I paced on slowly." Pope. "With speed so pace." Shak.
  3. To walk over with measured tread; to move slowly over or upon; as, the guard paces his round.

    "Pacing light the velvet plain." T. Warton.
  4. The length of a step in walking or marching, reckoned from the heel of one foot to the heel of the other; -- used as a unit in measuring distances; as, he advanced fifty paces.

    "The heigh of sixty pace ." Chaucer.

    * Ordinarily the pace is estimated at two and one half linear feet; but in measuring distances be stepping, the pace is extended to three feet (one yard) or to three and three tenths feet (one fifth of a rod). The regulation marching pace in the English and United States armies is thirty inches for quick time, and thirty-six inches for double time. The Roman pace (passus) was from the heel of one foot to the heel of the same foot when it next touched the ground, five Roman feet.

  5. To proceed; to pass on.

    [Obs.]

    Or [ere] that I further in this tale pace. Chaucer.

  6. To measure by steps or paces; as, to pace a piece of ground.
  7. Manner of stepping or moving; gait; walk; as, the walk, trot, canter, gallop, and amble are paces of the horse; a swaggering pace; a quick pace.

    Chaucer.

    To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
    Creeps in this petty pace from day to day.
    Shak.

    In the military schools of riding a variety of paces are taught. Walsh.

  8. To move quickly by lifting the legs on the same side together, as a horse; to amble with rapidity; to rack.
  9. To develop, guide, or control the pace or paces of; to teach the pace; to break in.

    If you can, pace your wisdom
    In that good path that I would wish it go.
    Shak

    To pace the web (Weaving), to wind up the cloth on the beam, periodically, as it is woven, in a loom.

  10. A slow gait; a footpace.

    [Obs.] Chucer.
  11. To pass away; to die.

    [Obs.] Chaucer.
  12. Specifically, a kind of fast amble; a rack.
  13. Any single movement, step, or procedure.

    [R.]

    The first pace necessary for his majesty to make is to fall into confidence with Spain. Sir W. Temple.

  14. A broad step or platform; any part of a floor slightly raised above the rest, as around an altar, or at the upper end of a hall.
  15. A device in a loom, to maintain tension on the warp in pacing the web.

    Geometrical pace, the space from heel to heel between the spot where one foot is set down and that where the same foot is again set down, loosely estimated at five feet, or by some at four feet and two fifths. See Roman pace in the Note under def. 2. [Obs.] -- To keep, or hold, pace with, to keep up with; to go as fast as. "In intellect and attainments he kept pace with his age." Southey.

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Pace

PACE, noun [Latin , to open, Gr., to tread. See Pass.]

1. A step.

2. The space between the two feet in walking, estimated at two feet and a half. But the geometrical pace is five feet, or the whole space passed over by the same foot from one step to another. Sixty thousand such paces make one degree on the equator.

3. Manner of walking; a gait; as a languishing pace; a heavy pace; a quick or slow pace

4. Step; gradation in business. [Little used.]

5. A mode of stepping among horses, in which the legs on the same side are lifted together. In a general sense, the word may be applied to any other mode of stepping.

6. Degree of celerity. Let him mend his pace

To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow, creeps in this petty pace from day to day--

To keep or hold pace to keep up; to go or move as fast as something else.

PACE, verb intransitive

1. To go; to walk; to move.

2. To go, move or walk slowly.

3. To move by lifting the legs on the same side together, as a horse.

PACE, verb transitive

1. To measure by steps; as, to pace a piece of ground.

2. To regulate in motion.

If you ca, pace your wisdom in that good path that I would wish it go--

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The definitions are linked to my 1611KJV Bible and I want the pure definition of a word, not today's redefined words.

— Denise

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

strong

STRONG, a. [G., L. The sense of the radical word is to stretch, strain, draw, and probably from the root of stretch and reach.]

1. Having physical active power, or great physical power; having the power of exerting great bodily force; vigorous. A patient is recovering from sickness, but is not yet strong enough to walk. A strong man will lift twice his own weight.

That our oxen may be strong to labor. Psalm 144.

Orses the strong to greater strength must yield.

2. Having physical passive power; having ability to bear or endure; firm; solid; as a constitution strong enough to bear the fatigues of a campaign.

3. Well fortified; able to sustain attacks; not easily subdued or taken; as a strong fortress or town.

4. Having great military or naval force; powerful; as a strong army or fleet; a strong nation; a nation strong at sea.

5. Having great wealth, means or resources; as a strong house or company of merchants.

6. Moving with rapidity; violent; forcible; impetuous; as a strong current of water or wind; the wind was strong from the northeast; we had a strong tide against us.

7. Hale; sound; robust; as a strong constitution.

8. Powerful; forcible; cogent; adapted to make a deep or effectual impression on the mind or imagination; as a strong argument; strong reasons; strong evidence; a strong example or instance. He used strong language.

9. Ardent; eager; zealous; earnestly engaged; as a strong partisan; a strong whig or tory.

Her mother, ever strong against that match--

10. Having virtues of great efficacy; or having a particular quality in a great degree; as a strong powder or tincture; a strong decoction; strong tea; strong coffee.

11. Full of spirit; intoxicating; as strong liquors.

12. Affecting the sight forcibly; as strong colors.

13. Affecting the taste forcibly; as the strong flavor of onions.

14. Affecting the smell powerfully; as a strong scent.

15. Not of easy digestion; solid; as strong meat. Hebrews 5.

16. Well established; firm; not easily overthrown or altered; as a custom grown strong by time.

17. Violent; vehement; earnest.

Who in the day of his flesh, when he offered up prayers with strong crying and tears-- Hebrews 5.

18. Able; furnished with abilities.

I was stronger in prophecy than in criticism.

19. Having great force of mind, of intellect or of any faculty; as a man of strong powers of mind; a man of a strong mind or intellect; a man of strong memory, judgment or imagination.

20. Having great force; comprising much in few words.

Like her sweet voice is thy harmonious song, as high, as sweet, as easy and as strong.

21. Bright; glaring; vivid; as a strong light.

22. Powerful to the extent of force named; as an army ten thousand strong.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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