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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [parallel]

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parallel

PAR'ALLEL, a. [Gr. against or opposite, and one the other.]

1. In geometry, extended in the same direction, and in all parts equally distant. One body or line is parallel to another, when the surfaces of the bodies or the lines are at an equal distance throughout the whole length.

2. Having the same direction or tendency; running in accordance with something.

When honor runs parallel with the laws of God and our country, it cannot be too much cherished.

3. Continuing a resemblance through many particulars; like; similar; equal in all essential parts; as a parallel case; a parallel passage in the evangelists.

PAR'ALLEL, n. A line which throughout its whole extent is equidistant from another line; as parallels of latitude.

Who made the spider parallels design,

Sure as De Moivre without rule or line?

1. A line on the globe marking the latitude.

2. Direction conformable to that of another line.

3. Conformity continued through many particulars or in all essential points; resemblance; likeness.

'Twixt earthly females and the moon,

All parallels exactly run.

4. Comparison made; as, to draw a parallel between two characters.

5. Any thing equal to or resembling another in all essential particulars.

None but thyself can be thy parallel.

PAR'ALLEL, v.t. To place so as to keep the same direction, and at an equal distance from something else.

1. To level; to equal.

2. To correspond to.

3. To be equal to; to resemble in all essential points.

4. To compare.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [parallel]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

PAR'ALLEL, a. [Gr. against or opposite, and one the other.]

1. In geometry, extended in the same direction, and in all parts equally distant. One body or line is parallel to another, when the surfaces of the bodies or the lines are at an equal distance throughout the whole length.

2. Having the same direction or tendency; running in accordance with something.

When honor runs parallel with the laws of God and our country, it cannot be too much cherished.

3. Continuing a resemblance through many particulars; like; similar; equal in all essential parts; as a parallel case; a parallel passage in the evangelists.

PAR'ALLEL, n. A line which throughout its whole extent is equidistant from another line; as parallels of latitude.

Who made the spider parallels design,

Sure as De Moivre without rule or line?

1. A line on the globe marking the latitude.

2. Direction conformable to that of another line.

3. Conformity continued through many particulars or in all essential points; resemblance; likeness.

'Twixt earthly females and the moon,

All parallels exactly run.

4. Comparison made; as, to draw a parallel between two characters.

5. Any thing equal to or resembling another in all essential particulars.

None but thyself can be thy parallel.

PAR'ALLEL, v.t. To place so as to keep the same direction, and at an equal distance from something else.

1. To level; to equal.

2. To correspond to.

3. To be equal to; to resemble in all essential points.

4. To compare.

PAR'AL-LEL, a. [Gr. παραλληλος; παρα, against or opposite, and αλληλων, one the other.]

  1. In geometry, extended in the same direction, and in all parts equally distant. One body or line is parallel to another, when the surfaces of the bodies or the lines are at an equal distance throughout the whole length.
  2. Having the same direction or tendency; running in accordance with something. When honor runs parallel with the laws of God and our country, it can not be too much cherished. – Addison.
  3. Continuing a resemblance through many particulars; like; equal in all essential parts; as, a parallel case; a parallel passage in the evangelists. – Watts.

PAR'AL-LEL, n.

  1. A line which throughout its whole extent is equidistant from another line; as, parallels of latitude. Who made the spider parallels design, / Sure as De Moivre without rule or line? – Pope.
  2. A line on the globe marking the latitude.
  3. Direction conformable to that of another line. – Garth.
  4. Conformity continued through many particulars or in all essential points; resemblance; likeness. 'Twixt earthly females and the moon, / All parallels exactly run. – Swift.
  5. Comparison made; as, to draw a parallel between two characters. – Addison.
  6. Any thing equal to or resembling another in all essential particulars. None but thyself can be thy parallel. – Pope.

PAR'AL-LEL, v.t.

  1. To place so as to keep the same direction, and at an equal distance from something else. Brown.
  2. To level; to equal. – Fell. Shak.
  3. To correspond to. – Burnet.
  4. To be equal to; to resemble in all essential points. – Dryden.
  5. To compare. – Locke.

Par"al*lel
  1. Extended in the same direction, and in all parts equally distant; as, parallel lines; parallel planes.

    Revolutions . . . parallel to the equinoctial. Hakluyt.

    * Curved lines or curved planes are said to be parallel when they are in all parts equally distant.

  2. A line which, throughout its whole extent, is equidistant from another line] a parallel line, a parallel plane, etc.

    Who made the spider parallels design,
    Sure as De Moivre, without rule or line ?
    Pope.

  3. To place or set so as to be parallel] to place so as to be parallel to, or to conform in direction with, something else.

    The needle . . . doth parallel and place itself upon the true meridian. Sir T. Browne.

  4. To be parallel; to correspond; to be like.

    [Obs.] Bacon.
  5. That arrangement of an electrical system in which all positive poles, electrodes, terminals, etc., are joined to one conductor, and all negative poles, etc., to another conductor; -- called also multiple. Opposed to series.

    * Parts of a system so arranged are said to be in parallel or in multiple.

  6. Having the same direction or tendency; running side by side; being in accordance (with); tending to the same result; -- used with to and with.

    When honor runs parallel with the laws of God and our country, it can not be too much cherished. Addison.

  7. Direction conformable to that of another line,

    Lines that from their parallel decline. Garth.

  8. Fig.: To make to conform to something else in character, motive, aim, or the like.

    His life is paralleled
    Even with the stroke and line of his great justice.
    Shak.

  9. Continuing a resemblance through many particulars; applicable in all essential parts; like; similar; as, a parallel case; a parallel passage.

    Addison.

    Parallel bar. (a) (Steam Eng.) A rod in a parallel motion which is parallel with the working beam. (b) One of a pair of bars raised about five feet above the floor or ground, and parallel to each other, -- used for gymnastic exercises. -- Parallel circles of a sphere, those circles of the sphere whose planes are parallel to each other. -- Parallel columns, or Parallels (Printing), two or more passages of reading matter printed side by side, for the purpose of emphasizing the similarity or discrepancy between them. -- Parallel forces (Mech.), forces which act in directions parallel to each other. -- Parallel motion. (a) (Mach.) A jointed system of links, rods, or bars, by which the motion of a reciprocating piece, as a piston rod, may be guided, either approximately or exactly in a straight line. Rankine. (b) (Mus.) The ascending or descending of two or more parts at fixed intervals, as thirds or sixths. -- Parallel rod (Locomotive Eng.), a metal rod that connects the crank pins of two or more driving wheels; -- called also couping rod, in distinction from the connecting rod. See Illust. of Locomotive, in App. -- Parallel ruler, an instrument for drawing parallel lines, so constructed as to have the successive positions of the ruling edge parallel to each other; also, one consisting of two movable parts, the opposite edges of which are always parallel. - - Parallel sailing (Naut.), sailing on a parallel of latitude. -- Parallel sphere (Astron. *** Geog.), that position of the sphere in which the circles of daily motion are parallel to the horizon, as to an observer at either pole. -- Parallel vise, a vise having jaws so guided as to remain parallel in all positions.

  10. Conformity continued through many particulars or in all essential points; resemblance; similarity.

    Twixt earthly females and the moon
    All parallels exactly run.
    Swift.

  11. To equal; to match; to correspond to.

    Shak.
  12. A comparison made; elaborate tracing of similarity; as, Johnson's parallel between Dryden and Pope.
  13. To produce or adduce as a parallel.

    [R.] Locke.

    My young remembrance can not parallel
    A fellow to it.
    Shak.

  14. Anything equal to, or resembling, another in all essential particulars; a counterpart.

    None but thyself can be thy parallel. Pope.

  15. One of the imaginary circles on the surface of the earth, parallel to the equator, marking the latitude; also, the corresponding line on a globe or map.
  16. One of a series of long trenches constructed before a besieged fortress, by the besieging force, as a cover for troops supporting the attacking batteries. They are roughly parallel to the line of outer defenses of the fortress.
  17. A character consisting of two parallel vertical lines (thus, ||) used in the text to direct attention to a similarly marked note in the margin or at the foot of a page.

    Limiting parallels. See under Limit, v. t. -- Parallel of altitude (Astron.), one of the small circles of the sphere, parallel to the horizon; an almucantar. -- Parallel of declination (Astron.), one of the small circles of the sphere, parallel to the equator. -- Parallel of latitude. (a) (Geog.) See def. 6. above. (b) (Astron.) One of the small circles of the sphere, parallel to the ecliptic.

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Parallel

PAR'ALLEL, adjective [Gr. against or opposite, and one the other.]

1. In geometry, extended in the same direction, and in all parts equally distant. One body or line is parallel to another, when the surfaces of the bodies or the lines are at an equal distance throughout the whole length.

2. Having the same direction or tendency; running in accordance with something.

When honor runs parallel with the laws of God and our country, it cannot be too much cherished.

3. Continuing a resemblance through many particulars; like; similar; equal in all essential parts; as a parallel case; a parallel passage in the evangelists.

PAR'ALLEL, noun A line which throughout its whole extent is equidistant from another line; as parallels of latitude.

Who made the spider parallels design,

Sure as De Moivre without rule or line?

1. A line on the globe marking the latitude.

2. Direction conformable to that of another line.

3. Conformity continued through many particulars or in all essential points; resemblance; likeness.

'Twixt earthly females and the moon,

All parallels exactly run.

4. Comparison made; as, to draw a parallel between two characters.

5. Any thing equal to or resembling another in all essential particulars.

None but thyself can be thy parallel

PAR'ALLEL, verb transitive To place so as to keep the same direction, and at an equal distance from something else.

1. To level; to equal.

2. To correspond to.

3. To be equal to; to resemble in all essential points.

4. To compare.

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Because, to me, the words have their meanings and have not to my knowledge been altered.

— Edwin

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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COPARTMENT, n. The same as compartment. [Not in use.]

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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