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Saturday - November 18, 2017

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [pay]

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pay

PAY, v.t. pret. and pp. paid.

1. To discharge a debt; to deliver to a creditor the value of the debt, either in money or goods, to his acceptance or satisfaction, by which the obligation of the debtor is discharged.

2. To discharge a duty created by promise or by custom or by the moral law; as, to pay a debt of honor or of kindness.

You have paid down

More penitence,than done trespass.

3. To fulfill; to perform what is promised; as, to pay one's vows.

4. To render what is due to a superior, or demanded by civility or courtesy; as, to pay respect to a magistrate; to pay due honor to parents.

5. To beat.

For which, or pay me quickly, or I'll pay you.

6. To reward; to recompense; as, to pay for kindness with neglect.

To pay for, to make amends; to atone by suffering. Men often pay for their mistakes with loss of property or reputation, sometimes with life.

1. To give an equivalent for any thing purchased.

To pay,or pay over, in seamen's language, to daub or besmear the surface of any body, to preserve it from injury by water or weather.

To pay the bottom of a vessel, to cover it with a composition of tallow, sulphur, rosin, &c.; to bream.

To pay a mast or yard, to besmear it with tar, turpentine, rosin, tallow or varnish.

pay a seam, to pour melted pitch along it, so as to defend the oakum.

To pay off; to make compensation to and discharge; as, to pay off the crew of a ship.

To pay out, to slacken, extend or cause to run out; as, to pay out more cable.

PAY, v.i. To pay off,in seamen's language, is to fall to leeward, as the head of a ship.

To pay on, to beat with vigor; to redouble blows. [Colloquial.]

PAY, n. Compensation; recompense; an equivalent given for money due, goods purchased or services performed; salary or wages for services; hire. The merchant receives pay for goods sold; the soldier receives pay for his services,but the soldiers of the American revolution never received full pay.

1. Compensation; reward.

Here only merit constant pay receives--



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [pay]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

PAY, v.t. pret. and pp. paid.

1. To discharge a debt; to deliver to a creditor the value of the debt, either in money or goods, to his acceptance or satisfaction, by which the obligation of the debtor is discharged.

2. To discharge a duty created by promise or by custom or by the moral law; as, to pay a debt of honor or of kindness.

You have paid down

More penitence,than done trespass.

3. To fulfill; to perform what is promised; as, to pay one's vows.

4. To render what is due to a superior, or demanded by civility or courtesy; as, to pay respect to a magistrate; to pay due honor to parents.

5. To beat.

For which, or pay me quickly, or I'll pay you.

6. To reward; to recompense; as, to pay for kindness with neglect.

To pay for, to make amends; to atone by suffering. Men often pay for their mistakes with loss of property or reputation, sometimes with life.

1. To give an equivalent for any thing purchased.

To pay,or pay over, in seamen's language, to daub or besmear the surface of any body, to preserve it from injury by water or weather.

To pay the bottom of a vessel, to cover it with a composition of tallow, sulphur, rosin, &c.; to bream.

To pay a mast or yard, to besmear it with tar, turpentine, rosin, tallow or varnish.

pay a seam, to pour melted pitch along it, so as to defend the oakum.

To pay off; to make compensation to and discharge; as, to pay off the crew of a ship.

To pay out, to slacken, extend or cause to run out; as, to pay out more cable.

PAY, v.i. To pay off,in seamen's language, is to fall to leeward, as the head of a ship.

To pay on, to beat with vigor; to redouble blows. [Colloquial.]

PAY, n. Compensation; recompense; an equivalent given for money due, goods purchased or services performed; salary or wages for services; hire. The merchant receives pay for goods sold; the soldier receives pay for his services,but the soldiers of the American revolution never received full pay.

1. Compensation; reward.

Here only merit constant pay receives--

PAY, n.

  1. Compensation; recompense; an equivalent given for money due, goods purchased or services performed; salary or wages for services; hire. The merchant receives pay for goods sold; the soldier receives pay for his services, but the soldiers of the American revolution never received full pay.
  2. Compensation; reward. Here only merit constant pay receives. – Pope.

PAY, v.i.

To pay, as, in seamen's language, is to fall to leeward, as the head of a ship. – Mar. Dict. To pay on, to beat with vigor; to redouble blows. [Colloquial.]


PAY, v.t. [pret. and pp. paid. Fr. payer, Norm. pair, contracted from It. pagare, Port and Sp. pagar, Arm. paca. Class Bg. From the different applications of pay, the sense appears to be to send or send to, for in our vulgar language, to pay on, is to strike, to beat; and to pay with pitch, is to put on or rub over. In the sense of strike, this coincides with the Greek παιω, εμπαιω, W. pwyaw. In another seamen's phrase, the word signifies to loosen or slacken, as to pay out cable, that is, to send or extend. But this word can not belong to the root of the Greek and Welsh words, unless these are contracted from Pg or Pk.]

  1. To discharge a debt; to deliver to a creditor the value of the debt, either in money or goods, to his acceptance or satisfaction, by which the obligation of the debtor is discharged.
  2. To discharge a duty created by promise or by custom or by the moral law; as, to pay a debt of honor or of kindness. You have paid down / More penitence, than done trespass. – Shak.
  3. To fulfill; to perform what is promised; as, to pay one's vows. – Scripture.
  4. To render what is due to a superior, or demanded by civility or courtesy; as, to pay respect to a magistrate; to pay due honor to parents.
  5. To beat. For which, or pay me quickly, or I'll pay you. – B. Jonson.
  6. To reward; to recompense; as, to pay for kindness with neglect. – Dryden. To pay for, to make amends; to atone by suffering. Men often pay for their mistakes with loss of property or reputation, sometimes with life.
  7. To give on equivalent for any thing purchased. To pay, or pay over, in seamen's language, to daub or besmear the surface of any body, to preserve it from injury by water or weather. To pay the bottom of a vessel, to cover it with a composition of tallow, sulphur, resin, &c; to bream. To pay a mast or yard, to besmear it with tar, turpentine, resin, tallow or varnish. To pay a seam, to pour melted pitch along it, so as to defend the oakum. To pay off, to make compensation to and discharge; as, to pay off the crew of a ship. To pay out, to slacken, extend or cause to run out; as, to pay out more cable. – Mar. Dict.

Pay
  1. To cover, as bottom of a vessel, a seam, a spar, etc., with tar or pitch, or waterproof composition of tallow, resin, etc.; to smear.
  2. To satisfy, or content] specifically, to satisfy (another person) for service rendered, property delivered, etc.; to discharge one's obligation to; to make due return to; to compensate; to remunerate; to recompense; to requite; as, to pay workmen or servants.

    May no penny ale them pay [i. e., satisfy]. P. Plowman.

    [She] pays me with disdain. Dryden.

  3. Hence, to make or secure suitable return for expense or trouble; to be remunerative or profitable; to be worth the effort or pains required; as, it will pay to ride; it will pay to wait; politeness always pays.

    To pay for. (a) To make amends for; to atone for; as, men often pay for their mistakes with loss of property or reputation, sometimes with life. (b) To give an equivalent for; to bear the expense of; to be mulcted on account of.

    'T was I paid for your sleeps; I watched your wakings. Beau. *** Fl.

    -- To pay off. [Etymol. uncertain.] (Naut.) To fall to leeward, as the head of a vessel under sail. -- To pay on. [Etymol. uncertain.] To beat with vigor] to redouble blows. [Colloq.] -- To pay round [Etymol. uncertain.] (Naut.) To turn the ship's head.

  4. Satisfaction; content.

    Chaucer.
  5. Hence, figuratively: To compensate justly; to requite according to merit; to reward; to punish; to retort or retaliate upon.

    For which, or pay me quickly, or I'll pay you. B. Jonson.

  6. An equivalent or return for money due, goods purchased, or services performed; salary or wages for work or service; compensation; recompense; payment; hire; as, the pay of a clerk; the pay of a soldier.

    Where only merit constant pay receives. Pope.

    There is neither pay nor plunder to be got. L'Estrange.

    Full pay, the whole amount of wages or salary; maximum pay; especially, the highest pay or allowance to civil or military officers of a certain rank, without deductions. -- Half pay. See under Half. -- Pay day, the day of settlement of accounts. -- Pay dirt (Mining), earth which yields a profit to the miner. [Western U.S.] -- Pay office, a place where payment is made. -- Pay roll, a roll or list of persons entitled to payment, with the amounts due.

  7. To discharge, as a debt, demand, or obligation, by giving or doing what is due or required; to deliver the amount or value of to the person to whom it is owing; to discharge a debt by delivering (money owed).

    "Pay me that thou owest." Matt. xviii. 28.

    Have patience with me, and I will pay thee all. Matt. xviii. 26.

    If they pay this tax, they starve. Tennyson.

  8. To discharge or fulfill, as a duy; to perform or render duty, as that which has been promised.

    This day have I paid my vows. Prov. vii. 14.

  9. To give or offer, without an implied obligation; as, to pay attention; to pay a visit.

    Not paying me a welcome. Shak.

    To pay off. (a) To make compensation to and discharge; as, to pay off the crew of a ship. (b) To allow (a thread, cord, etc.) to run off; to unwind. -- To pay one's duty, to render homage, as to a sovereign or other superior. -- To pay out (Naut.), to pass out; hence, to slacken; to allow to run out; as, to pay out more cable. See under Cable. -- To pay the piper, to bear the cost, expense, or trouble. [Colloq.]

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Pay

PAY, verb transitive preterit tense and participle passive paid.

1. To discharge a debt; to deliver to a creditor the value of the debt, either in money or goods, to his acceptance or satisfaction, by which the obligation of the debtor is discharged.

2. To discharge a duty created by promise or by custom or by the moral law; as, to pay a debt of honor or of kindness.

You have paid down

More penitence, than done trespass.

3. To fulfill; to perform what is promised; as, to pay one's vows.

4. To render what is due to a superior, or demanded by civility or courtesy; as, to pay respect to a magistrate; to pay due honor to parents.

5. To beat.

For which, or pay me quickly, or I'll pay you.

6. To reward; to recompense; as, to pay for kindness with neglect.

To pay for, to make amends; to atone by suffering. Men often pay for their mistakes with loss of property or reputation, sometimes with life.

1. To give an equivalent for any thing purchased.

To pay or pay over, in seamen's language, to daub or besmear the surface of any body, to preserve it from injury by water or weather.

To pay the bottom of a vessel, to cover it with a composition of tallow, sulphur, rosin, etc.; to bream.

To pay a mast or yard, to besmear it with tar, turpentine, rosin, tallow or varnish.

PAY a seam, to pour melted pitch along it, so as to defend the oakum.

To pay off; to make compensation to and discharge; as, to pay off the crew of a ship.

To pay out, to slacken, extend or cause to run out; as, to pay out more cable.

PAY, verb intransitive To pay off, in seamen's language, is to fall to leeward, as the head of a ship.

To pay on, to beat with vigor; to redouble blows. [Colloquial.]

PAY, noun Compensation; recompense; an equivalent given for money due, goods purchased or services performed; salary or wages for services; hire. The merchant receives pay for goods sold; the soldier receives pay for his services, but the soldiers of the American revolution never received full pay

1. Compensation; reward.

Here only merit constant pay receives--

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

fulfillment

FULFILL'MENT,

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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