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Friday - November 17, 2017

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [perch]

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perch

PERCH, n. [L. perca.] A fish of the genus Perca. This fish has a deep body, very rough scales, an arched back, and prickly dorsal fins.

PERCH, n. [L. pertica.]

1. A pole; hence, a roost for fowls, which is often a pole; also, any thing on which they light.

2. A measure of length containing five yards and a half; a rod. In the popular language of America, rod is chiefly used; but rod,pole, and perch, all signifying the same thing, may be used indifferently.

PERCH, v.i. To sit or roost; as a bird.

1. To light or settle on a fixed body; as a bird.

PERCH, v.t. To place on a fixed object or perch.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [perch]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

PERCH, n. [L. perca.] A fish of the genus Perca. This fish has a deep body, very rough scales, an arched back, and prickly dorsal fins.

PERCH, n. [L. pertica.]

1. A pole; hence, a roost for fowls, which is often a pole; also, any thing on which they light.

2. A measure of length containing five yards and a half; a rod. In the popular language of America, rod is chiefly used; but rod,pole, and perch, all signifying the same thing, may be used indifferently.

PERCH, v.i. To sit or roost; as a bird.

1. To light or settle on a fixed body; as a bird.

PERCH, v.t. To place on a fixed object or perch.


PERCH, n.1 [Fr. perche; L. perca; G. bars, a perch, and barsch, sharp, keen, pungent; D. baars; Sw. abbore; Dan. aborre. It would seem from the German, that this fish is named from its prickly spines, and the name allied to perk.]

The popular name of several species of a genus of acanthopterygious fishes called by naturalists Perca. They have powerful dorsal fins, with strong and sharp spines. The scales are moderately large, with the posterior edge toothed. They all feed on marine insects, and inhabit fresh water.


PERCH, n.2 [Fr. perche; L. pertica; W. perc; Arm. perchen; probably allied to the former word in the sense of sharpness, shooting or extending. See Perk.]

  1. A pole; hence, a roost for fowls, which is often a pole; also, any thing on which they light.
  2. A measure of length containing five yards and a half; a rod. In the popular language of America, rod is chiefly used; but rod, pole, and perch, all signifying the same thing, may be used indifferently.

PERCH, v.i.

  1. To sit or roost; as a bird.
  2. To light or settle on a fixed body; as a bird.

PERCH, v.t.

To place on a fixed object or perch. – More.


Perch
  1. Any fresh-water fish of the genus Perca and of several other allied genera of the family Percidæ, as the common American or yellow perch (Perca flavescens, or Americana), and the European perch (P. fluviatilis).
  2. A pole; a long staff; a rod; esp., a pole or other support for fowls to roost on or to rest on; a roost; figuratively, any elevated resting place or seat.

    As chauntecleer among his wives all
    Sat on his perche, that was in his hall.
    Chaucer.

    Not making his high place the lawless perch
    Of winged ambitions.
    Tennyson.

  3. To alight or settle, as a bird] to sit or roost.

    Wrens make prey where eagles dare not perch. Shak.

  4. To place or to set on, or as on, a perch.
  5. Any one of numerous species of spiny-finned fishes belonging to the Percidæ, Serranidæ, and related families, and resembling, more or less, the true perches.

    Black perch. (a) The black bass. (b) The flasher. (c) The sea bass. -- Blue perch, the cunner. -- Gray perch, the fresh-water drum. -- Red perch, the rosefish. -- Red-bellied perch, the long- eared pondfish. -- Perch pest, a small crustacean, parasitic in the mouth of the perch. -- Silver perch, the yellowtail. -- Stone, or Striped, perch, the pope. -- White perch, the Roccus, or Morone, Americanus, a small silvery serranoid market fish of the Atlantic coast.

  6. A measure of length containing five and a half yards; a rod, or pole.

    (b)
  7. To occupy as a perch.

    Milton.
  8. A pole connecting the fore gear and hind gear of a spring carriage; a reach.
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Perch

PERCH, noun [Latin perca.] A fish of the genus Perca. This fish has a deep body, very rough scales, an arched back, and prickly dorsal fins.

PERCH, noun [Latin pertica.]

1. A pole; hence, a roost for fowls, which is often a pole; also, any thing on which they light.

2. A measure of length containing five yards and a half; a rod. In the popular language of America, rod is chiefly used; but rod, pole, and perch all signifying the same thing, may be used indifferently.

PERCH, verb intransitive To sit or roost; as a bird.

1. To light or settle on a fixed body; as a bird.

PERCH, verb transitive To place on a fixed object or perch

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— Lynn (Baden, ON)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

hemisphere

HEM'ISPHERE, n. [Gr.] A half sphere; one half of a sphere or globe, when divided by a plane passing through its center. In astronomy, one half the mundane sphere. The equator divides the sphere into two equal parts. That on the north is called the northern hemisphere; the other, the southern. So the horizon divides the sphere into the upper and lower hemispheres. Hemisphere is also used for a map or projection of half the terrestrial or celestial sphere, and is then often called planisphere.

1. A map or projection of half the terrestrial globe.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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