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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [solid]

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solid

SOL'ID, a. [L, solidus; from the sense to setting or pressure, and hence allied to L. solum, Eng. sill.]

1. Hard; firm; compact; having its constituent particles so close or dense as to resist the impression or penetration of other bodies. Hence solid bodies are not penetrable, not are the parts moveable and easily displaced like those of fluids. Solid is opposed to fluid and liquid.

2. Not hollow; full of matter; as a solid globe or cone, as distinguished from a hollow one.

3. Having all the gemetrical dimensions; cubic; as, a solid foot contains 1728 solid inhes. [In this sense, cubic is not generally used.]

4. Firm; compact; strong; as a solid pier; a solid pile; a solid wall.

5. Sound; not weakly; as a solid constitution of body. [Sound is more generally used.]

6. Real; sound; valid; true; just; not empty or fallacious. Wise men seek solid reasons for their opinions.

7. Grave; profound; not light, trifling or superficial. These wanting wit, affect gravity, and go by the name of solid men.

8. In botany, of a fleshy, uniform, undivided substance, as a bulb or root; not spungy or hollow within, as a stem.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [solid]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

SOL'ID, a. [L, solidus; from the sense to setting or pressure, and hence allied to L. solum, Eng. sill.]

1. Hard; firm; compact; having its constituent particles so close or dense as to resist the impression or penetration of other bodies. Hence solid bodies are not penetrable, not are the parts moveable and easily displaced like those of fluids. Solid is opposed to fluid and liquid.

2. Not hollow; full of matter; as a solid globe or cone, as distinguished from a hollow one.

3. Having all the gemetrical dimensions; cubic; as, a solid foot contains 1728 solid inhes. [In this sense, cubic is not generally used.]

4. Firm; compact; strong; as a solid pier; a solid pile; a solid wall.

5. Sound; not weakly; as a solid constitution of body. [Sound is more generally used.]

6. Real; sound; valid; true; just; not empty or fallacious. Wise men seek solid reasons for their opinions.

7. Grave; profound; not light, trifling or superficial. These wanting wit, affect gravity, and go by the name of solid men.

8. In botany, of a fleshy, uniform, undivided substance, as a bulb or root; not spungy or hollow within, as a stem.

SOL'ID, a. [L. solidus; Fr. solide; It. and Sp. solido; from the sense of setting or pressure, and hence allied to L. solum, Eng. sill.]

  1. Hard; firm; compact; having its constituent particles so close or dense as to resist the impression or penetration of other bodies. Hence solid bodies are not penetrable, nor are the parts movable and easily displaced like those of fluids. Solid is opposed to fluid and liquid.
  2. Not hollow; full of matter; as, a solid globe or cone, as distinguished from a hollow one.
  3. Having all the geometrical dimensions; cubic; as, a solid foot contains 1728 solid inches. Arbuthnot. [In this sense, cubic is now generally used.]
  4. Firm; compact; strong; as, a solid pier; a solid pile; a solid wall. – Addison.
  5. Sound; not weakly; as, a solid constitution of body. [Sound is more generally used.] – Watts.
  6. Real; sound; valid; true; just; not empty or fallacious. Wise men seek solid reasons for their opinions.
  7. Grave; profound; not light, trifling or superficial. These wanting wit, affect gravity, and go by the name of solid men. – Dryden.
  8. In botany, of a fleshy, uniform, undivided substance, as a bulb or root; not spongy or hollow within, as a stem. – Martyn. A solid foot contains 1728 solid inches, weighing 1000 ounces of rain water. Solid angle, an angle formed by three or more plane angles meeting to a point. Solid square, in military language, is a square body of troops; a body in which the ranks and files are equal.

SOL'ID, n.

A firm compact body. In anatomy and medical science, the bones, flesh and vessels of animal bodies are called solids, in distinction from the blood, chyle and other fluids.


Sol"id
  1. Having the constituent parts so compact, or so firmly adhering, as to resist the impression or penetration of other bodies; having a fixed form; hard; firm; compact; -- opposed to fluid and liquid or to plastic, like clay, or to incompact, like sand.
  2. A substance that is held in a fixed form by cohesion among its particles; a substance not fluid.
  3. Not hollow; full of matter; as, a solid globe or cone, as distinguished from a hollow one; not spongy; dense; hence, sometimes, heavy.
  4. A magnitude which has length, breadth, and thickness; a part of space bounded on all sides.

    Solid of revolution. (Geom.) See Revolution, n., 5.

  5. Having all the geometrical dimensions; cubic; as, a solid foot contains 1,728 solid inches.

    * In this sense, cubics now generally used.

  6. Firm; compact; strong; stable; unyielding; as, a solid pier; a solid pile; a solid wall.
  7. Applied to a compound word whose parts are closely united and form an unbroken word; -- opposed to hyphened.
  8. Fig.: Worthy of credit, trust, or esteem; substantial, as opposed to frivolous or fallacious; weighty; firm; strong; valid; just; genuine.

    The solid purpose of a sincere and virtuous answer. Milton.

    These, wanting wit, affect gravity, and go by the name of solid men. Dryden.

    The genius of the Italians wrought by solid toil what the myth-making imagination of the Germans had projected in a poem. J. A. Symonds.

  9. Sound; not weakly; as, a solid constitution of body.

    I. Watts.
  10. Of a fleshy, uniform, undivided substance, as a bulb or root; not spongy or hollow within, as a stem.
  11. Impenetrable; resisting or excluding any other material particle or atom from any given portion of space; -- applied to the supposed ultimate particles of matter.
  12. Not having the lines separated by leads; not open.
  13. United; without division; unanimous; as, the delegation is solid for a candidate.

    [Polit. Cant. U.S.]

    Solid angle. (Geom.) See under Angle. -- Solid color, an even color; one not shaded or variegated. -- Solid green. See Emerald green (a), under Green. -- Solid measure (Arith.), a measure for volumes, in which the units are each a cube of fixed linear magnitude, as a cubic foot, yard, or the like; thus, a foot, in solid measure, or a solid foot, contains 1,728 solid inches. -- Solid newel (Arch.), a newel into which the ends of winding stairs are built, in distinction from a hollow newel. See under Hollow, a. -- Solid problem (Geom.), a problem which can be construed geometrically, only by the intersection of a circle and a conic section or of two conic sections. Hutton. -- Solid square (Mil.), a square body or troops in which the ranks and files are equal.

    Syn. -- Hard; firm; compact; strong; substantial; stable; sound; real; valid; true; just; weighty; profound; grave; important. -- Solid, Hard. These words both relate to the internal constitution of bodies; but hardnotes a more impenetrable nature or a firmer adherence of the component parts than solid. Hard is opposed to soft, and solid to fluid, liquid, open, or hollow. Wood is usually solid; but some kinds of wood are hard, and others are soft.

    Repose you there; while I [return] to this hard house,
    More harder than the stones whereof 't is raised.
    Shak.

    I hear his thundering voice resound,
    And trampling feet than shake the solid ground.
    Dryden.

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Solid

SOL'ID, adjective [L, solidus; from the sense to setting or pressure, and hence allied to Latin solum, Eng. sill.]

1. Hard; firm; compact; having its constituent particles so close or dense as to resist the impression or penetration of other bodies. Hence solid bodies are not penetrable, not are the parts moveable and easily displaced like those of fluids. solid is opposed to fluid and liquid.

2. Not hollow; full of matter; as a solid globe or cone, as distinguished from a hollow one.

3. Having all the gemetrical dimensions; cubic; as, a solid foot contains 1728 solid inhes. [In this sense, cubic is not generally used.]

4. Firm; compact; strong; as a solid pier; a solid pile; a solid wall.

5. Sound; not weakly; as a solid constitution of body. [Sound is more generally used.]

6. Real; sound; valid; true; just; not empty or fallacious. Wise men seek solid reasons for their opinions.

7. Grave; profound; not light, trifling or superficial. These wanting wit, affect gravity, and go by the name of solid men.

8. In botany, of a fleshy, uniform, undivided substance, as a bulb or root; not spungy or hollow within, as a stem.

A solid FOOT, contains 1728 solid inches, weighing 1000 ounces of rain water.

SOLID ANGLE, an angle formed by three or more plain angles meeting in a point.

SOLID SQUARE, in military language, is a square body of troops; a body in which the ranks and files are equal.

SO'LID, noun A firm compact body. In anatomy and medical science, the bones, flesh and vessls of animal bodies are called solids, in distinction from the blood, chyle and other fluids.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

euthanasy

EU'THANASY, n. [Gr. death.] An easy death.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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