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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [tooth]

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tooth

TOOTH, n. plu. teeth. [L. dens.]

1. A bony substance growing out of the jaws of animals, and serving as the instrument of mastication. The teeth are also very useful in assisting persons in the utterance of words, and when well formed and sound, they are ornamental. The teeth of animals differ in shape, being destined for different offices. The front teeth in men and quadrupeds are called incisors, or incisive or cutting teeth; next to these are the pointed teeth, called canine or dog teeth; and on the sides of the jaws are the molar teeth or grinders.

2. Taste; palate.

These are not dishes for thy dainty tooth.

3. A tine; a prong; something pointed and resembling an animal tooth; as the tooth of a rake, a comb, a card, a harrow, a saw, or of a wheel. The teeth of a wheel are sometimes called cogs,and are destined to catch corresponding parts of other wheels.

Tooth and nail, [by biting and scratching,] with one's utmost power; by all possible means.

To the teeth, in open opposition; directly to one's face.

That I shall live, and tell him to his teeth.

To cast in the teeth, to retort reproachfully; to insult to the face.

In spite of the teeth, in defiance of opposition; in opposition to every effort.

To show the teeth, to threaten.

When the law shows her teeth, but dares not bite.

TOOTH, v.t. To furnish with teeth; as, to tooth a rake.

1. To indent; to cut into teeth; to jag; as, to tooth a saw.

2. To lock into each other.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [tooth]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

TOOTH, n. plu. teeth. [L. dens.]

1. A bony substance growing out of the jaws of animals, and serving as the instrument of mastication. The teeth are also very useful in assisting persons in the utterance of words, and when well formed and sound, they are ornamental. The teeth of animals differ in shape, being destined for different offices. The front teeth in men and quadrupeds are called incisors, or incisive or cutting teeth; next to these are the pointed teeth, called canine or dog teeth; and on the sides of the jaws are the molar teeth or grinders.

2. Taste; palate.

These are not dishes for thy dainty tooth.

3. A tine; a prong; something pointed and resembling an animal tooth; as the tooth of a rake, a comb, a card, a harrow, a saw, or of a wheel. The teeth of a wheel are sometimes called cogs,and are destined to catch corresponding parts of other wheels.

Tooth and nail, [by biting and scratching,] with one's utmost power; by all possible means.

To the teeth, in open opposition; directly to one's face.

That I shall live, and tell him to his teeth.

To cast in the teeth, to retort reproachfully; to insult to the face.

In spite of the teeth, in defiance of opposition; in opposition to every effort.

To show the teeth, to threaten.

When the law shows her teeth, but dares not bite.

TOOTH, v.t. To furnish with teeth; as, to tooth a rake.

1. To indent; to cut into teeth; to jag; as, to tooth a saw.

2. To lock into each other.

TOOTH, n. [plur. Teeth. Sax. toth, plur. teth. It corresponds with W. did and têth, a teat, Gaelic, did, dead, and with toot, supra; signifying a shoot. If n is not radical in the L. dens, Gr. οδους, οδοντος, this is the same word.]

  1. A bony substance growing out of the jaws of animals, and serving as the instrument of mastication. The teeth are also very useful in assisting persons in the utterance of words, and when well formed and sound, they are ornamental. The teeth of animals differ in shape, being destined for different offices. The front teeth in men and quadrupeds are called incisors, or incisive or cutting teeth; next to these are the pointed teeth, called laniary, canine or dog teeth; and on the sides of the jaws are the molar teeth or grinders.
  2. Taste; palate. These are not dishes for thy dainty tooth. Dryden.
  3. A tine; a prong; something pointed and resembling an animal tooth; as, the tooth of a rake, a comb, a card, a harrow, a saw, or of a wheel. The teeth of a wheel are sometimes called cogs, and are destined to catch corresponding parts of other wheels. Tooth and nail, [by biting and scratching,] with one's utmost power; by all possible means. L'Estrange. To the teeth, in open opposition; directly to one's face. That I shall live, and tell him to his teeth. Shak. To cast in the teeth, to retort reproachfully; to insult to the face. Hooker. In spite of the teeth, in defiance of opposition; in opposition to every effort. Shak. To show the teeth, to threaten. When the taw shows her teeth, but dares not bite. Young.

TOOTH, v.t.

  1. To furnish with teeth; as, to tooth a rake.
  2. To indent; to cut into teeth; to jag; as, to tooth a saw.
  3. To lock into each other. Moxon.

Tooth
  1. One of the hard, bony appendages which are borne on the jaws, or on other bones in the walls of the mouth or pharynx of most vertebrates, and which usually aid in the prehension and mastication of food.

    * The hard parts of teeth are principally made up of dentine, or ivory, and a very hard substance called enamel. These are variously combined in different animals. Each tooth consist of three parts, a crown, or body, projecting above the gum, one or more fangs imbedded in the jaw, and the neck, or intermediate part. In some animals one or more of the teeth are modified into tusks which project from the mouth, as in both sexes of the elephant and of the walrus, and in the male narwhal.

    In adult man there are thirty-two teeth, composed largely of dentine, but the crowns are covered with enamel, and the fangs with a layer of bone called cementum. Of the eight teeth on each half of each jaw, the two in front are incisors, then come one canine, cuspid, or dog tooth, two bicuspids, or false molars, and three molars, or grinding teeth. The milk, or temporary, teeth are only twenty in number, there being two incisors, one canine, and two molars on each half of each jaw. The last molars, or wisdom teeth, usually appear long after the others, and occasionally do not appear above the jaw at all.

    How sharper than a serpent's tooth it is
    To have a thankless child !
    Shak.

  2. To furnish with teeth.

    The twin cards toothed with glittering wire. Wordsworth.

  3. Fig.: Taste; palate.

    These are not dishes for thy dainty tooth. Dryden.

  4. To indent] to jag; as, to tooth a saw.
  5. Any projection corresponding to the tooth of an animal, in shape, position, or office; as, the teeth, or cogs, of a cogwheel; a tooth, prong, or tine, of a fork; a tooth, or the teeth, of a rake, a saw, a file, a card.
  6. To lock into each other. See Tooth, n., 4.

    Moxon.
  7. A projecting member resembling a tenon, but fitting into a mortise that is only sunk, not pierced through.

    (b)
  8. An angular or prominence on any edge; as, a tooth on the scale of a fish, or on a leaf of a plant

    ; specifically (Bot.)
  9. Any hard calcareous or chitinous organ found in the mouth of various invertebrates and used in feeding or procuring food; as, the teeth of a mollusk or a starfish.

    In spite of the teeth, in defiance of opposition; in opposition to every effort. -- In the teeth, directly; in direct opposition; in front. "Nor strive with all the tempest in my teeth." Pope. -- To cast in the teeth, to report reproachfully; to taunt or insult one with. -- Tooth and nail, as if by biting and scratching; with one's utmost power; by all possible means. L'Estrange. "I shall fight tooth and nail for international copyright." Charles Reade. -- Tooth coralline (Zoöl.), any sertularian hydroid. -- Tooth edge, the sensation excited in the teeth by grating sounds, and by the touch of certain substances, as keen acids. -- Tooth key, an instrument used to extract teeth by a motion resembling that of turning a key. -- Tooth net, a large fishing net anchored. [Scot.] Jamieson. -- Tooth ornament. (Arch.) Same as Dogtooth, n., 2. -- Tooth powder, a powder for cleaning the teeth; a dentifrice. - - Tooth rash. (Med.) See Red-gum, 1. -- To show the teeth, to threaten. "When the Law shows her teeth, but dares not bite." Young. -- To the teeth, in open opposition; directly to one's face. "That I shall live, and tell him to his teeth ." Shak.

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Tooth

TOOTH, noun plural teeth. [Latin dens.]

1. A bony substance growing out of the jaws of animals, and serving as the instrument of mastication. The teeth are also very useful in assisting persons in the utterance of words, and when well formed and sound, they are ornamental. The teeth of animals differ in shape, being destined for different offices. The front teeth in men and quadrupeds are called incisors, or incisive or cutting teeth; next to these are the pointed teeth, called canine or dog teeth; and on the sides of the jaws are the molar teeth or grinders.

2. Taste; palate.

These are not dishes for thy dainty tooth

3. A tine; a prong; something pointed and resembling an animal tooth; as the tooth of a rake, a comb, a card, a harrow, a saw, or of a wheel. The teeth of a wheel are sometimes called cogs, and are destined to catch corresponding parts of other wheels.

TOOTH and nail, [by biting and scratching, ] with one's utmost power; by all possible means.

To the teeth, in open opposition; directly to one's face.

That I shall live, and tell him to his teeth.

To cast in the teeth, to retort reproachfully; to insult to the face.

In spite of the teeth, in defiance of opposition; in opposition to every effort.

To show the teeth, to threaten.

When the law shows her teeth, but dares not bite.

TOOTH, verb transitive To furnish with teeth; as, to tooth a rake.

1. To indent; to cut into teeth; to jag; as, to tooth a saw.

2. To lock into each other.

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As I study the scriptures, there are words that are now antiquated but I want to know the meaning of. I can find the meaning in time but this dictionary takes me to that time period and supplies what I need for a true contextual understanding.

— Barbara (Avondale, AZ)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

master

M`ASTER, n. [L. magister, compounded of the root of magis, major, greater.]

1. A man who rules, governs or directs either men or business. A man who owns slaves is their master; he who has servants is their master; he who has apprentices is their master; he who has apprentices is their master, as he has the government and direction of them. The man who superintends and directs any business, is master, or master workman.

O thou my friend, my genius, come along,

Thou master of the poet and the song.

Nations that want protectors, will have masters.

2. A director, head, or chief manager; as the master of a feast.

3. The owner; proprietor; with the idea of governing. The master of a house may be the owner, or the occupant, who has a temporary right of governing it.

It would be believed that he rather took the horse for his subject, than his master.

4. A lord; a ruler; one who has supreme dominion.

Caesar, the world's great master and his own.

5. A chief; a principal; as the master root of a plant.

One master passion swallows up the rest.

6. One who has possession, and the power of controlling or using at pleasure.

When I have made myself master of a hundred thousand drachmas--

7. The commander of a merchant ship.

8. In ships of war, an officer who takes rank immediately after the lieutenants,and navigates the ship under the direction of the captain.

9. The director of a school; a teacher; an instructor.

In this sense the word is giving place to the more appropriate words teacher, instructor and preceptor; at least it is so in the United States.

10. One uncontrolled.

Let every man be master of his time.

11. An appellation of respect.

Master doctor, you have brought those drugs.

12. An appellation given to young men.

Where there are little masters and misses in a house--

13. A man eminently or perfectly skilled in any occupation, art or science. We say, a man is master of his business; a great master of music, of the flute or violin; a master of his subject, &c.

14. A title of dignity in colleges and universities; as Master of Arts.

15. The chief of a society; as the Grand Master of Malta, of free-masons, &c.

16. The director of ceremonies at public places, or on public occasions.

17. The president of a college.

Master in chancery, an assistant of the lord chancellor, chosen from among the barristers to sit in chancery, or at the rolls.

To be master of one's self, to have the command or control of one's own passions.

The word master has numerous applications, in all of which it has the sense of director, chief or superintendent.

As a title of respect given to adult persons, it is pronounced mister; a pronunciation which seems to have been derived from some of the northern dialects. [supra.]

M`ASTER, v.i. To conquer; to overpower; to subdue; to bring under control.

Obstinacy and willful neglect must be mastered, even though it costs blows.

Evil customs must be mastered by degrees.

1. To execute with skill.

I will not offer that which I cannot master.

2. To rule; to govern.

--And rather father thee than master thee. [Not used.]

M`ASTER, v.i. To be skillful; to excel.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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